Strathclyde Telegraph

Managing Stress

As students, we’re no strangers to feeling stressed and we all experience it in different ways. Looming deadlines and too much time spent counting the days till exam season can trigger feelings of anxiety in even the most organized people. The next half of the semester is going to feel totally nuts.

So what can we do to ride out the emotional tsunami that is stress and come out on top? If nothing else, the past four years have equipped me with some tips for stress management that range from Netflix binges to morning meditation. If you’re looking for a quick fix, the age old phone a friend method can provide you with the reassurance that you need. Feeling a little more adventurous? Head over to the app store and try out some mindfulness apps; these are handy little tools that can talk you through breathing techniques and meditation skills that are scientifically proven to work! There are plenty of options, a lot of them are free, and daily ten-minute time out for mindfulness can keep you feeling grounded.

Living away from the family home from your first year to your final one can be another stressor. If you’re finding this difficult, try to make time for a visit home or a video chat! Getting involved with the universities extracurricular activities can also make this easier, many have found a second family in their sports teams or societies, and keeping busy is great for beating the stress that loneliness and homesickness can bring.

Finding balance is something from which we all benefit. Taking the time to actively de-stress through enjoyable activities, whether it be watching your favourite TV series or baking brownies, must be balanced with keeping on top of coursework and other work commitments or you can leave yourself feeling overwhelmed.

Remember, stress is a completely natural response. The most important thing you can do when you are faced with it is to address it! Reach out to others when you need to, and use coping methods that work for you. University will teach you that success and failure are fleeting, and stress is inevitable, but we do not have to let it beat us.

By Claudia Scott